Wednesday, February 27, 2013

First deadline approaching...


March1st is the deadline to submit your initial application materials!  


R.E. TAYLOR STUDENT POSTER AWARD COMPETITION ANNOUNCEMENT

The Society for Archaeological Sciences invites applications for the R.E. Taylor Poster Award at the Society for American Archaeology's 76th Anniversary Meeting in Honolulu, Hawaii.
This prestigious award acknowledges innovative student contributions to archaeological research through the use of scientific methods, and has enhanced the careers of prominent young scholars and professionals for more than a decade. The award is named in honor of Professor Emeritus R. Ervin Taylor of the University of California at Riverside for his outstanding contributions in the development and application of radiocarbon dating in archaeological research and his dedication to the founding of the Society for Archaeological Sciences; his leading role as President (1980) and General Secretary (1981-2002) of the Society; and his committed service as editor of the SAS Bulletin. Professor Taylor's many valuable contributions were recognized by the SAA in 2004 with the Fryxell Award for Interdisciplinary Research. The award consists of $100 US, a one-year SAS membership and subscription to the SAS Bulletin.

Entries will be judged on the significance of the archaeological problem, appropriateness of the methods used, soundness of conclusions, quality of the poster display, and oral presentation of the poster by the student, who should be the first author in order to be considered.

Students should submit an email application to Destiny Crider (destiny.crider@asu.edu) by March 1, 2013. Applications must include the title and abstract of the poster, evidence that you have registered for the SAA meetings in Honolulu (email from the SAA), and proof of your status as an undergraduate or graduate student (usually appears on your SAA registration). Email confirmation that your application has been received will be sent to you.

Please keep this email confirmation. In order to give the judges adequate time to posters, students will also be required to submit a PDF version of their poster on or before March 22 , 2013. Judges will be present in person at the SAA meetings to judge posters and to ask students questions about their research. Prizes will be awarded at the SAA meetings following the end of the last poster session.

Good luck to everyone!
To enter contact Destiny Crider (destiny.crider@asu.edu)

Saturday, February 16, 2013

John Weymouth, former president of SAS

I'm sad to pass along this news:

"John Walter Weymouth, emeritus professor of physics at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, died December 20, 2012, from complications of Parkinson's disease. John was born on the Stanford campus in Palo Alto, California, where his father and grandfather were professors. He attended both Stanford and Berkeley and earned a PhD in physics. He taught and did research in physics at the University of California, Vassar College, Clarkson University, and the University of Nebraska where he retired in l989.

"In mid-career John became interested in the application of scientific methods in archeology and worked with the NPS on many U.S. sites, for NATO-sponsored work in Greece, and other agencies. His pioneering work in the use of magnetometers and other remote sensing tools for subsurface mapping of sites transformed geophysical prospection in North American from a type of special analysis to an invaluable and standard part of contemporary archeology. He has been recognized with awards from the Society of American Archaeology and Nebraska Historical Society and, most recently, The Geological Society of America for lifetime achievement in the field of archeological geology."  (From the NPS)

From the Lincoln Journal Star:

January 05, 2013 2:30 am  •  

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John Walter Weymouth, died December 20, 2012 from complications of Parkinson's disease. John was born on Stanford campus in Palo Alto, Calif., where his father and grandfather were professors. He attended both Stanford and Berkeley and earned a PhD in physics. He taught and did research in physics at the University of California, Vassar College, Clarkson University, and the University of Nebraska where he retired in l989. In mid-career John became interested in the application of scientific methods in archaeology and has worked with the National Park Service on many U.S. sites, for NATO sponsored work in Greece and other agencies. His pioneering work in the use of magnetometers and other remote sensing tools for subsurface mapping of sites has transformed geophysical prospection in North American from a type of special analysis to an invaluable and standard part of contemporary archaeology. His work was termed "unparalleled" and "groundbreaking". He has been recognized with awards from the Society of American Archaeology and Nebraska Historical Society and, most recently, The Geological Society of America for lifetime achievement in the field of archaeological geology. His family knew him as an exceedingly humble, thoughtful and gentle man, with a wonderful sense of humor; he loved puns, silly stories--we recall the exploits of Sir Basil Digmore, fabled and fictional archaeologist--and jokes. He loved his family, was a huge fan of opera and was super fond of his dogs.


He is survived by his wife, Laura; sons, Terry (Jacki), and Daniel(Deborah); daughter, Evelyn; step-daughter, Victoria; daughter-in-law, Rae Ann; six grandchildren; one great grandchild; and four step-greats; as well as Josie, a small Spaniel. Preceding him in death were his parents, two sisters, and his first wife, Patricia.
Memorial Service: 2 p.m. Saturday (1/5/13) at Unitarian Church, 6300 'A' Street, with Rev. Fritz Hudson officiating. Memorials in John's honor may be sent to the National Center for Science Education or the Southern Poverty Law Center. Condolences can be left online atwww.roperandsons.com.


John wrote a number of seminal papers on magnetometry and U.S. archaeology.

He was the SAA's Fryxell Medalist for interdisciplinary research in archaeology and the physical sciences in 1998.

John was a longtime member of the Society for Archaeological Sciences, and was its 4th president.

We'll miss you, John.

----
Rob Sternberg
Franklin & Marshall College
General Secretary, SAS