Thursday, June 9, 2011

ArchaeoLandscapes Europe website

The ArchaeoLandscapes Europe project website has been launched at http://www.archaeolandscapes.eu.


The target of the ArchaeoLandscapes project is to address existing imbalances in the use of modern surveying and remote sensing techniques and to create conditions for the regular use of these strikingly successful techniques across Europe as a whole. It aims to create a self-sustaining network to support the use throughout the Continent of aerial survey and ‘remote sensing’ to promote understanding, conservation and public enjoyment of the shared landscape and archaeological heritage of the countries of the European Union.

There will soon be an opportunity to subscribe to the ArcLand newsletter. In the meantime, one can subscribe to a public calendar which will provide information on upcoming activities of ArchaeoLandscapes Europe and on other related events.

From:
Dr. Axel G. Posluschny M.A.
Project Manager
ArchaeoLandscapes Europe
Roman-Germanic Commission of the
German Archaeological Institute
Palmengartenstr. 10-12
D-60325 Frankfurt/Main
Germany
Email: posluschny@rgk.dainst.de
Url: http://www.archaeolandscapes.eu

Wednesday, June 8, 2011

2011 Fryxell Award to R. Lee Lyman

From the SAA Archaeological Record:

http://coas.missouri.edu/news/2011/lyman.shtml
No single person has brought such strong taphonomic and paleontological rigor to the discipline of zooarchaeology as R. Lee Lyman. His work has been instrumental in convincing Quaternary scientists and conservation biologists on the value of archaeological records to understanding past ecosystems. Early in his career, Lyman initiated leading-edge research by devising rigorous methods for measuring animal bone density, which greatly increased our ability to assess the role that human and nonhuman forces play in creating faunal assemblages. His research on cervids was immediately embraced by the archaeological community, and later expanded to include numerous taxa from diverse geographic locations and temporal periods. His problem-oriented research revolutionized the study of marine mammals with regional-scale analysis of butchery, prey demography, biogeography, and modern conservation. His publication record by any measure is extraordinary. Lyman's meticulous, quantitative methods have become the gold standard to which his students and peers are always striving to achieve. It is for these reasons and more that we honor R. Lee Lyman with this award.


The 2012 Award (from SAA):
The Fryxell Award is presented in recognition for interdisciplinary excellence of a scientist who need not be an archaeologist, but whose research has contributed significantly to American archaeology. The award is made possible through the generosity of the family of the late Roald Fryxell, a geologist whose career exemplified the crucial role of multidisciplinary cooperation in archaeology. Nominees are evaluated on the breadth and depth of their research and its impact on American archaeology, the nominee’s role in increasing awareness of interdisciplinary studies in archaeology, and the nominee’s public and professional service to the community. The award cycles through zoological sciences, botanical sciences, earth sciences, physical sciences, and general interdisciplinary studies. The 2012 Fryxell Award will be in the area of botanical sciences. The award will be given at the SAA’s 77th Annual Meeting, 2012, in Memphis, Tennessee. The award consists of an engraved medal, a certificate, an award citation read by the SAA president during the annual business meeting, and a half-day symposium at the Annual Meeting held in honor of the awardee.