Wednesday, December 21, 2011

Sponsored Symposium: Technology and the Modern Archaeologist: Technological Applications for Marine and Terrestrial Archaeology


For those of you attending the 45th Annual Meeting for the Society of Historical Archaeology in Baltimore on January 5th, 2012, consider checking out the following symposium:


Sponsored Symposium: Technology and the Modern Archaeologist: Technological Applications for Marine and Terrestrial Archaeology
Modern archaeologists are using GPR, AUVs, portable XRF and other “high technologies” borrowed from geology, chemistry, physics, biology, and soil science to better understand past human behaviors. This symposium’s intent is to review emerging technological topics including: digital archiving, 3d scanning, adaptation of handheld touch devices to fieldwork, web based applications, 3d artifact scanning, and more. It is the Technologies Committee’s goal to present as varied a program as possible based on the technologies archaeologists are currently using in the field, lab, and office. While few historical archaeologists have access to all of these state of the art technologies it is important that they be aware of new equipment and techniques that maybe applicable to their research and occupation.

 [SYM-182a] 9:00 am –  2 pm (Harborside - Essex A & B)
Sponsor: SHA Technology Committee, organized and chaired by: Jonathan R. Libbon, Richard J. Lundin
Richard John Lundin, Closing the Circle: The Evolution and Promise of Portable Archaeogeophysical and Archaeogeochemical Technologies (VLF-EM, pXRF, pXRD, pRAMAN and FLIR) for Archaeological Field Studies
Jean B. Pelletier, Anthony G. Randolph, Marine Remote Sensing and Dive Operations on an early 19th century Sailing Canal Boat in a Super Fund Site.
Robert A. Church, Robert F. Westrick, Daniel J. Warren, AUV Camera Capabilities for Deep-Water Archaeology
Peter Leach, Ben Ford, Through-Ice GPR on Lake Ontario: The Search for the Ice Gunboat
Benjamin P. Carter, Cheap, Durable and Affordable Digital Data Collection in the Field: Is There an 'App' for That?
Adam Brin, Francis P. McManamon, The Digital Archaeological Record: Providing Access to and Preservation of Archaeological Information
Clinton King, John Haynes, Bernard Means, Digitizing the Past in Three Dimensions: Virtual Curation of Historical Artifacts
Edward Gonzalez-Tennant, Dark Tourism, Social Justice Education, and Virtual Archaeology
Christopher Polglase, J.B. Pelletier, Integrating Terrestrial and Marine  Remote Sensing Techniques in a Near-shore Area
Peter Holt, Applying Technology to Site Data Management using Site 446Recorder 4 - Results from the Field
Elizabeth Davoli, “Seeing Through a Lakebed with a Sub-Bottom Profiler
Jackson Cothren, High Density Survey in Historic Archaeology: a Digital Ecosystem Approach
Geoffrey J. Avern, A Metrological Tracking System as a Powerful Multi-purpose Tool for Excavation Recording and Geophysical Survey.
Jonathan P. Smith, Artifacts In (Cyber)Space: Low-Cost 3D Scanning Techniques
Angela Jaillet, Beyond Big Words: A Methodological Approach to LiDAR in Historical Archaeology

Tuesday, December 20, 2011

2012 International Association for Obsidian Studies PXRF Shootout


Society for American Archaeology Meeting, Memphis, TN
April 18, 2012 from 8:00–6:00 (exact location TBD)


Organizers:
Jeff Speakman,
Center for Applied Isotope Studies, University of Georgia, Athens, GA
M. Steven Shackley,
Archaeological XRF Laboratory, Albuquerque, NM
Michael D. Glascock,
Archaeometry Laboratory, University of Missouri Research Reactor, Columbia, MO
Arlen Heginbotham,
J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, CA


Over the past 10 years, widespread availability in portable XRF instrumentation has resulted in a major paradigmatic shift in how obsidian source studies are conducted. This has resulted in concerns by some about the potential misuse of this emerging technology as well as a host of questions regarding accuracy, precision, and reproducibility. Following Shackley’s recent essay in the SAA Archaeological Record (see Nov 2010 pdf article ), we will hold a PXRF “shootout” at the 2012 SAA Meeting in Memphis. The purpose of this round robin exercise will be to evaluate the current state of inter-laboratory reproducibility when conducting quantitative portable XRF analyses of obsidian.

The round robin will occur from 8:00–6:00 on Wednesday April 18, 2012. Participants will be asked to analyze 10-12 obsidian samples (and optionally 4 ceramics) using their portable instrument and preferred calibration routine. Upon completion of the measurement, participants will complete a worksheet that describes their experimental setup, calibration routine, and values they determined from the analyses. Participants will receive 2–3 pieces of obsidian (and ceramics) that were included in the round robin to take with them. Results from this study will be tabulated and published in an appropriate venue.

If you own a portable XRF instrument and have analyzed or are contemplating the analysis of obsidian, this is something you will not want to miss!


Preregistration for this event is required and participation is limited.
Contact Jeff Speakman archsci@uga.edu to reserve your spot.

Wednesday, November 30, 2011

Virtual Repositories for a Global Archaeological Science

Idaho State University will be hosting workshop entitled "Virtual Repositories for a Global Archaeological Science" from November 30-December 2 2011. This workshop focuses on the virtualization of museum collections, allowing researchers from all over the world to study them remotely, and also focuses on the virtualization of cultural materials. The international workshop is coordinated by Herbert Maschner, director of the Idaho Museum of Natural History, Corey Schou, ISU director of the Informatics Research Institute (IRI), and Matt Betts, curator, Canadian Museum of Civilization, and is funded by the National Science Foundation.

Monday, November 7, 2011

Open Access Archaeology

A recent blog keeps a running list of reviews of Open Access Archaeology Journals here. The blog is maintained by Doug Rocks-Macqueen from the UK. He also created a search engine for open access archaeology here.

Friday, October 28, 2011

International Symposium on Archaeometry, Belgium, 28 May - 1 June, 2012

39th International Symposium on Archaeometry: “50 years of ISA”, Leuven, 2012"

Scope of the conference
The aim of the Symposium is to promote the development and use of scientific techniques in order to extract archaeological and historical information from the cultural heritage and the paleoenvironment. It involves all Natural Sciences and all types of objects and materials related with human activity.

On the town of Leuven
Leuven is very proud of both its past and its heritage. There is so much to see and to do in and around Leuven that one visit is simply not enough. From the 11th-12th century onwards, Leuven began to develop as an important trading centre. It is now a well-equipped, modern town with a thriving economy and with a good balance of old and new with a rich tradition. Amid all the leisure and student activities, it seems surprising that Leuven finds any time to work. When brewing became a nation-wide industry in the 19th century, Leuven became world famous for its beers, and today it is still proud to be known as the beer capital of Belgium, and possibly even the world.

On the University of Leuven
Situated at the heart of Western Europe, the K.U.Leuven has been a centre of learning for almost six centuries. Founded in 1425 by Pope Martin V, K.U.Leuven bears the honour of being the oldest Catholic university in the world still in existence and the oldest university in the Low Countries.

On archaeometry at the K.U. Leuven
In the recent past, at the K.U.Leuven, there have been many examples of co-operation between archaeological projects and different disciplines from the natural and applied sciences. In 2003 this co-operation was formalized in the Centre for Archaeological Sciences. It acts as a focal point for advanced interdisciplinary research made available to all archaeologists from Leuven, Belgium and the international community in general. The organization of the International Symposium on Archaeometry in 2012 is an extra incentive for the further development of archaeometrical research at the university and in Belgium.

On the symposium
The symposium will be organised in the (medieval) centre of Leuven, in one of the main auditoria with sufficient capacity and fully equipped with all necessary IT and audio-visual material. Also the necessary room for poster sessions and coffee breaks is nearby. The date of the symposium is 28 May to 1 June 2012. The official language of the symposium will be English.

The fee for the organisation of the symposium in Leuven is 280 Euro (students 125 Euro). This includes the conference fee and book of abstracts, a welcoming reception and a “50 years ISA” reception, all lunches and all coffee breaks.

Travel to Leuven
Leuven is situated at the very heart of Europe. The town of Leuven is situated at the junction of two major European motorways. Paris, London and Köln are only about two hours away by train. To come to Leuven by air, Brussels airport is situated about 20 km from Leuven and is easily accessible by public transport. Brussels South Charleroi Airport is located at 46 km from Brussels Centre. There are frequent international flights to almost any part of the world.

On the accommodation
Possibilities for hotel and other accommodation in Leuven (see also www.leuven.be) are plenty, ranging in price category from 20 Euro per night (youth hostel) to 180 Euro per night (5-star accommodation).

Liability and Insurance
The organizers of the ISA 2012 meeting do not accept any responsibility for personal injuries, material losses, or damages occurring during or in association with this symposium. It will be the responsibility of the participants to obtain adequate medical, travel or personal insurance for their participation in this event.

Tuesday, October 4, 2011

Heritage Threats

A recent editorial in Nature (477, 510, 29 September) outlines some of the threats to preservation and scientific study of our worldwide heritage. Rather than focusing on environmental or human effects physically altering heritage, this opinion piece focuses on the threats due to a lack of long term funding and lack of recognition. The authors point to the fact that the research is accomplished across disciplines without a home discipline. In addition, they suggest that the valuable research does not get the media attention and recognition that it deserves.

The article also refers to a recent European website (Heritage Portal) that is a portal to many aspects of heritage and science, brought together from most European countries into one location. It will be interesting to see how this develops and if there are other similar websites for other locations worldwide. If you know of one, please post to the blog!

However, is our discipline's multidisciplinary nature a strength or a weakness in terms of publicity and funding? Do we get enough recognition from our respective governments and funding bodies?

Wednesday, September 7, 2011

How Stable is your Rock Art Rock?


I was recently invited on a short weekend field trip to participate and observe data collection using the RASI - Rock Art Stability Index at the Petrified Forest National Park in Arizona. As explained on the RASI project website:
The Rock Art Stability Index is a tool that allows for the rapid assessment of the condition of a rock art site. It has been designed for use by college students, rock art volunteers and archaeologists, and only requires a minimum amount of training to conduct. Its purpose is to provide a replicable system to rank order various aspects of the observable physical condition of rock art sites, and to thereby score a site in terms of its current vulnerability.
This interdisciplinary team continues to test and revise the recording system that documents the conditions of the rocks and assessment for the potential loss of rock art due to weathering and erosion processes. The application of the RASI metrics has already proven to be significant for developing conservation and preservation strategies for archaeological resources in the Southwest. There is considerable potential for applying these metrics to other parks in the US, and other parts of the world with rock art.

The RASI component is part of a comprehensive program of rock art research developed by multi-institutional collaborators and tested in the American Southwest. Additional parts of the study include VML dating techniques and new geovisualization techniques of the rock art and RASI factors used to assess decay of panels.

Thanks to Dr. Nicole Cerveny and Dr. Casey Allen for inviting me along on their latest adventure.

Monday, August 1, 2011

Computers in Archaeology



The most recent issue of Computer (July 2011, Volume 44 number 7, ISBN 0018-9162,published by IEEE Computer Society) has several articles on computational archaeology and the use of computers in archaeology:

Using Computation to Decode the First Known Computer

Michael Edmunds, Cardiff University
Tony Freeth, Antikythera Mechanism Research Project
pp. 32-39

From Sites to Landscapes: How Computing Technology Is Shaping Archaeological Practice

Eugene Ch'ng, Univeristy of Birmingham, UK
Henry Chapman, Univeristy of Birmingham, UK
Vincent Gaffney, University of Birmingham, UK
Phil Murgatroyd, University of Birmingham, UK
Chris Gaffney, University of Bradford, UK
Wolfgang Neubauer, University of Vienna
pp. 40-46

3D Models for Cultural Heritage: Beyond Plain Visualization

Roberto Scopigno, ISTI-CNR
Marco Callieri, ISTI-CNR
Paolo Cignoni, ISTI-CNR
Massimiliano Corsini, ISTI-CNR
Matteo Dellepiane, ISTI-CNR
Federico Ponchio, ISTI-CNR
Guido Ranzuglia, ISTI-CNR
pp. 48-55

Dealing with Archaeology's Data Avalanche

Vid Petrovic, University of California, San Diego
Aaron Gidding, University of California, San Diego
Tom Wypych, University of California, San Diego
Falko Kuester, University of California, San Diego
Thomas A. DeFanti, University of California, San Diego
Thomas E. Levy, University of California, San Diego
pp. 56-60


Computer-Assisted Archaeological Line Drawing

Renju Li, Peking University
Tao Luo, Peking University
Hongbin Zha, Peking University
Wei Lu, Longmen Grottoes Academy, China
pp. 62-65


Some of these are free access and some are paid-access only.

Monday, July 25, 2011

New Book- Biomolecular Archaeology




Terry Brown and Keri Brown
John Wiley and Sons
ISBN: 978-1-4051-7960-7
2011, 336 pages

From the website:

Illustrated thoroughly, Biomolecular Archaeology is the first book to clearly guide students through the study of ancient DNA: how to analyze biomolecular evidence (DNA, proteins, lipids and carbohydrates) to address important archaeological questions.
  • The first book to address the scope and methods of this new cross-disciplinary area of research for archaeologists
  • Offers a completely up-to-date overview of the latest research in this innovative subject
  • Guides students who wish to become biomolecular archaeologists through the complexities of both the scientific methods and archaeological goals.
  • Provides an essential component to undergraduate and graduate archaeological research


Thursday, June 9, 2011

ArchaeoLandscapes Europe website

The ArchaeoLandscapes Europe project website has been launched at http://www.archaeolandscapes.eu.


The target of the ArchaeoLandscapes project is to address existing imbalances in the use of modern surveying and remote sensing techniques and to create conditions for the regular use of these strikingly successful techniques across Europe as a whole. It aims to create a self-sustaining network to support the use throughout the Continent of aerial survey and ‘remote sensing’ to promote understanding, conservation and public enjoyment of the shared landscape and archaeological heritage of the countries of the European Union.

There will soon be an opportunity to subscribe to the ArcLand newsletter. In the meantime, one can subscribe to a public calendar which will provide information on upcoming activities of ArchaeoLandscapes Europe and on other related events.

From:
Dr. Axel G. Posluschny M.A.
Project Manager
ArchaeoLandscapes Europe
Roman-Germanic Commission of the
German Archaeological Institute
Palmengartenstr. 10-12
D-60325 Frankfurt/Main
Germany
Email: posluschny@rgk.dainst.de
Url: http://www.archaeolandscapes.eu

Wednesday, June 8, 2011

2011 Fryxell Award to R. Lee Lyman

From the SAA Archaeological Record:

http://coas.missouri.edu/news/2011/lyman.shtml
No single person has brought such strong taphonomic and paleontological rigor to the discipline of zooarchaeology as R. Lee Lyman. His work has been instrumental in convincing Quaternary scientists and conservation biologists on the value of archaeological records to understanding past ecosystems. Early in his career, Lyman initiated leading-edge research by devising rigorous methods for measuring animal bone density, which greatly increased our ability to assess the role that human and nonhuman forces play in creating faunal assemblages. His research on cervids was immediately embraced by the archaeological community, and later expanded to include numerous taxa from diverse geographic locations and temporal periods. His problem-oriented research revolutionized the study of marine mammals with regional-scale analysis of butchery, prey demography, biogeography, and modern conservation. His publication record by any measure is extraordinary. Lyman's meticulous, quantitative methods have become the gold standard to which his students and peers are always striving to achieve. It is for these reasons and more that we honor R. Lee Lyman with this award.


The 2012 Award (from SAA):
The Fryxell Award is presented in recognition for interdisciplinary excellence of a scientist who need not be an archaeologist, but whose research has contributed significantly to American archaeology. The award is made possible through the generosity of the family of the late Roald Fryxell, a geologist whose career exemplified the crucial role of multidisciplinary cooperation in archaeology. Nominees are evaluated on the breadth and depth of their research and its impact on American archaeology, the nominee’s role in increasing awareness of interdisciplinary studies in archaeology, and the nominee’s public and professional service to the community. The award cycles through zoological sciences, botanical sciences, earth sciences, physical sciences, and general interdisciplinary studies. The 2012 Fryxell Award will be in the area of botanical sciences. The award will be given at the SAA’s 77th Annual Meeting, 2012, in Memphis, Tennessee. The award consists of an engraved medal, a certificate, an award citation read by the SAA president during the annual business meeting, and a half-day symposium at the Annual Meeting held in honor of the awardee.

Wednesday, May 18, 2011

New geoarchaeology book by GSA

Geoarchaeology, Climate Change, and Sustainability

Edited by Antony G. Brown, Laura S. Basell, and Karl W. Butzer
2011, 174 pp.

"This volume provides a broad survey of recent advances in geoarchaeology with particular attention to environmental change. The fourteen chapters include methodologically innovative research, case studies valuable for teaching, and the use of geological techniques to answer archaeological questions from lower Paleolithic hunting to the location of Homer’s Ithaca. Geoarchaeology, Climate Change, and Sustainability also includes a major position paper and, unusually, two papers on the management of the geoarchaeological resource. Both the geographical and chronological coverage are broad ranging from the Lower Paleolithic (lower Pleistocene) to the Iron Age (late Holocene), and from rural Iran to urban Manhattan. The research presented here clearly demonstrates the value and practical application of geoarchaeological techniques from sediment-based dating to geographic information systems."



Wednesday, May 11, 2011

JAAS Issue on Synchrotron Radiation in Art and Archaeology



JAAS (Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectroscopy) recently released a special issue on synchrotron radiation in art and archaeometry. This issue is the proceedings of the 2010 conference of the same name. The cover articles on X-ray investigations of paintings are available for free through the end of May.


Friday, April 15, 2011

SAS Bulletins all online!


Online Archive of SAS Bulletins from 1996-2010



At the recent SAS Business Meeting at the SAA in Sacramento, the membership voted to provide instant online access to the SAS Bulletins upon publication. Previously we did not post the print issue until a year after publication. After a spirited debate on the merits of this change, we have implemented a plan to provide online access to all the current issues. The print edition is still in the mail to paid membership for those of you that enjoy turning the page rather than scrolling on your screen!

So take some time to check out past editions of the the SAS Bulletin. Every issue is packed with book reviews, meeting announcements, highlights of recent research and meeting presentations, and reports by scholars in various specializations of archaeological science.

Thursday, April 7, 2011

Annual NPS archaeological geophysics workshop

MIDWEST ARCHEOLOGICAL CENTER
Current Archeological Prospection Advances for Non-destructive Investigations in the 21st Century
May 23-27, 2011
LOCATION: Palo Alto Battlefield National Historical Park,
Cameron County, Texas

DESCRIPTION: This workshop is designed to provide a practical application of geophysical equipment and aerial photographic techniques available for the identification, evaluation, and ultimately, the conservation and protection of cultural resources. The field exercises associated with the course will concentrate on the application of these techniques to archeological investigations. Instruction will be given in the use, processing, and interpretation of data from magnetometers, conductivity meters, resistivity meters, ground penetrating radar, metal detectors, and magnetic susceptibility instruments and their applications to non-destructive subsurface investigations. The major emphasis of the training will be on the field use of the equipment. Instruction will also be offered in the use of and interpretation of aerial photographic techniques, and in the use of low altitude large scale aerial reconnaissance.

For more information and application form: http://www.nps.gov/history/mwac/

Saturday, April 2, 2011

What I like about the SAA

In all fairness, I should provide the obverse to my previous post:
1. I'm surprised, a a geoscientist and as only a moderately social person, how many people I know at this meeting. I could feel the warmth of a career's worth of professional and personal associations at this meeting. I saw people I have known for 25 years, and a student I had in my class just two years ago. 2. There have been interesting talks and posters! The Clovis session yesterday had some controversy, different approaches, presented by veterans as well as newcomers. 3. The observation that the SAS, the main reason I am here, is still on solid ground. We have changed with the times, and grown in may ways. 4. Books. The exhibition hall was fun to wander through. I bought a book in archaeological theory, andfound out I was anthologized in an SAA book on chronometric methods (and got a free copy of that one). 5. Sacramento is a very pleasant city. The grounds of the capitol are lovely. I have been in Old Sacramento, and found a decent used book store (Time Tested Books). 6. I have been able to stay and spend some time with an old and dear friend. So, it's been a pretty good couple of days!

Friday, April 1, 2011

What I don't like about the SAA

It is interesting as a geoscientist to see how different disciplines run heir meetings.

Here is what I don't like abut the Society for American Archaeology meeting:

1. Introductions to speakers are absent to inadequate.

2. Almost all presenters literally read their papers, sometimes making no eye contact with the people who in theory are their audience

3. There are no questions of speakers after their presentations. (Summarizing 1-3, while some things are enjoyable to do alone, I thought conference presentations were supposed to involve exchanges of ideas.)

4.  Too many sessions are incestuous, with all papers coming from one academic or CRM group.  And this is possible because sessions are arranged by the organizers, who invites speakers of their choosing.  At geoscience meetings, all sessions are publicly announced, and anyone can submit a paper.  The incestuous sessions often contain work that is, shall we say, a bit on the light side.

5. Poor scheduling by the SAA.  Business meetings of groups with very similar interests are scheduled at the same time, and the SAS business meeting was scheduled at the same time as two different session that SAS sponsored.

6.  No wireless in the convention center.

7. I repeat, no wireless in the convention center. Or terminals.

Saturday, March 26, 2011

California Dreamin' - SAS annual business meeting

The annual SAS business meeting will be held at the SAA meeting in Sacramento, California, this coming week.

Meeting time and location:
Thursday, 31 March
5:00 pm–6:30 pm
Bataglieri (S)
Society for Archaeological Sciences
Business Meeting

Tentative agenda items:
SAS student travel research award
Wiley Encyclopedia
Membership
Officers' reports
Budget
Meeting site for 2012 (ISA, Belgium)
American venue for ISA 2014

Friday, March 18, 2011

Archaeometry at the MTAA Conference


I have been attending (and presenting at) the Modern Trends in Activation Analysis conference in College Station, Texas this week. There was a special session on Archaeometry organized and chaired by Mike Glascock. There were several interesting papers and posters on the archaeometry applications and methods development for NAA in archaeological science. Here are the papers and posters presented:

EVALUATION OF RELATIVE COMPARATOR AND k0-NAA FOR CHARACTERIZATION OF ABORIGINAL AUSTRALIAN OCHRE,Rachel S. Popelka-Filcoff, Claire E. Lenehan, Michael D. Glascock, John W. Bennett, Attila Stopic, Jamie Quinton, Allan Pring and Keryn Walshe, Flinders University, Australia

RAISING THE TEMPER - μ-SPOT ANALYSIS OF TEMPER INCLUSIONS IN EXPERIMENTAL CERAMICS, Johannes H. Sterba,Frans Munnik and Nick J. G. Pearce, Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, Austria

MODELING CLINAL VARIATION IN CLAY GEOCHEMISTRY FOR CERAMIC PROVENANCE DETERMINATION IN THE VALLEY OF OAXACA, Leah D. Minc, Oregon State University, USA

COMPOSITIONAL ANALYSIS OF PREHISTORIC SHELL FROM EASTERN NORTH AMERICA, Matthew T. Boulanger, University of Missouri, USA

PAST AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS OF ARCHAEOMETRY AT TAMU’S CENTER FOR CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND ANALYSIS, Suzanne L. Eckert, Texas A&M University, USA

ELEMENTAL ANALYSIS OF FINE-GRAINED BASALT ARTIFACTS FROM SAMOA: AN INVESTIGATION OF PROCUREMENT,PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION, AND CONSUMPTION DURING THE TRADITIONAL SAMOAN PERIOD (1700-300BP) ON TUTUILA ISLAND, Phillip R. Johnson, Texas A&M University, USA

REVITALIZING ARCHAEOMETRY IN AUSTRALIA WITH THE 20 MW OPAL RESEARCH REACTOR, John W. Bennett, Attila Stopic, Peter Grave, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, Australia

NEUTRON ACTIVATION ANALYSIS OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL ARTIFACTS USING THE CONVENTIONAL RELATIVE METHOD: A REALISTIC APPROACH FOR ANALYSIS OF LARGE SAMPLES, Patricia Bedregal Pablo Mendoza, Isaac Marcos Cohen, Eduardo Montoya, Instituto Peruano de Energía Nuclear, Perú

THE FENN CLOVIS CACHE: NEW ANALYSES OF ARTIFACT FORM AND FUNCTION, Ted Goebel, Jim Wiederhold,Heather Smith, and Michael R. Waters, Texas A&M University, USA

TRACKING INTRA-ISLAND MOVEMENT OF TOOL-STONE: CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION ON LITHIC TOOLS FROM AGANOA VILLAGE, TUTUILA ISLAND, AMERICAN SAMOA, Christopher T. Crews, Texas A&M University, USA

INAA AND DISTRIBUTION PATTERNS OF CLASSIC MIMBRES BLACK-ON-WHITE VESSELS DURING THE CLASSIC PERIOD, Eleanor S. Dahlin, Texas A&M University, USA

INAA OF PRE-CONTACT BASALT QUARRIES ON THE SAMOAN ISLAND OF TUTUILA: A PRELIMINARY BASELINE FOR AN ARTIFACT-CENTERED PROVENANCE STUDY, Phillip R. Johnson, Texas A&M University, USA

FINDING A SUCCESSFUL TECHNIQUE TO DETERMINE THE PRODUCTION PROVENANCE OF 13TH AND 14TH CENTURY SANTA FE B/W POTTERY MADE FROM IGNEOUS CLAYS, Suzanne L. Eckert, Texas A&M University, USA

COMPARISON OF INAA ELEMENTAL COMPOSITION DATA BETWEEN LAGO GRANDE AND OSVALDO ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITES IN THE CENTRAL AMAZON: A FIRST PERSPECTIVE, Roberto Hazenfratz, Guilherme Mongeló, Casimiro S. Munita, Eduardo G.Neves, University of São Paulo, Brazil

PROVENANCE STUDIES OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL ARTIFACTS FROM BUDDHIST SITES OF INDIA BY INTERNAL MONOSTANDARD NEUTRON ACTIVATION ANALYSIS, N. Lakshmana Das, K.B. Dasari, R. Acharya, A.V.R. Reddy, GITAM University, India